Chronicle

Lecture by Professor Joyce Gelb
September 28, 2010

On 28 September at 5 p.m. a lecture by Professor Joyce Gelb titled an "Oral History of Women Activists in New York" took place at the Center for Urban History.

Presented at this lecture was the "The Activist Women's Oral History Project", which was conducted by the City University of New York (CUNY) in the mid-1990's. The lecture focused on the particulars of the design, organization and the community education results of the research, during which dozens of in-depth interviews were taped with women who varied in age, race, ethnic group, educational background, marital status or sexual orientation, and who were active members of their community in different regions of New York.

On 29 September, a lecture by Prof. Joyce Gelb was held at the Ivan Franko National University titled "The Politics of the Obama Administration Regarding Women: Analysis and Assessment." The politics of the Obama administration regarding women was analyzed in this lecture, in particular its appointment of women to key posts, establishing a council on women and girls and also what influence government decisions have on women in the areas of health, domestic violence, education, anti-HIV/AIDS efforts and discussions regarding the rights of sexual minorities.

Joyce Gelb is Professor of Political Science at City College and the director of the Women's Studies Program at the City University of New York (CUNY). She was also a visiting professor at Yale University (USA) and at Doshisha and Tokyo Universities (Japan). Her research and publications deal primarily with gender aspects in comparative politics, particularly women's political participation, social movements and government politics regarding women in the U.S., Europe and Japan. Prof. Gelb received research grants from the Ford, Rockefeller and National Science Foundation. She is author of several books, including "Women and Public Policies: Reassessing Gender Politics" (Princeton, 1987) and "Gender Policies in Japan and the United States: Comparing Women’s Movements, Rights and Politics" (Palgrave, 2003).