Multilingualism in Lviv after 1867 with special reference to the judiciary

Multilingualism in Lviv after 1867 with special reference to the judiciary

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Jan Fellerer 

University of Oxford, Wolfson College

March 26, 2012

Center for Urban History, Lviv

Seminar held at the Center for Urban History, where Jan Fellerer, this year's Resident Scholar, presented his research.

Late 19th-century Lviv was an exceptionally polyglot place. Ukrainian, Polish, Yiddish and, to some extent, German were in regular use in speech, with a number of further languages employed in writing. Lviv’s multilingualism implied some day-to-day functioning as speakers of the various languages did inevitably come into direct contact with each other. This is easily forgotten given the ever-growing national tensions in the city since the 1860s. The talk aims at illustrating possible ways of reconstructing the co-existence of various languages in one city. Some judicial records were examined in more detail to see whether they offer a privileged vantage point to understand the workings of multilingualism in Lviv between ca. 1867 and 1914.


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