Urban Stories

This archive of interviews and conversations collected in the framework of various projects that have been implemented at the Center for Urban History from 2008 to today.

Selected Quotes

Puppet Plays for Adults

"... The theater’s repertoire used to include "The Night Before Christmas"..., back in the 1970s – early 1980s. When the Leningrad Company came with their adult performances, they revived "The Night Before Christmas" with the same actors that used to play in it in the past. It was very interesting. There was another interesting piece – "Mam'zelle Nitouche". Special puppets were produced, set designers and choreographers from Leningrad and Kyiv invited. You might think, “Puppets and choreographer… And what?” But that’s why those performances were so interesting because they featured choreographic scenes and some compelling plasticity solutions. The young actors also produced a very nice performance for adults – "Catch the Moment of Luck". ..."

Opanas Zalyvakha’s Exhibition

"... I decided to arrange Opanas Zalyvakha’s exhibition in Lviv (…) I invited television. So they come, and Panas, you know, is a handsome grey-haired man, well-behaved. They start talking to him, “Well, Opanas Ivanovych, we’ve read your biography, you were there and there, studied in Saint Petersburg with such and such famous people, etc. etc. And what did you do in this specific period?” And he says, “I was in Siberia for five years.” “Was it some sort of Komsomol package holiday or what?” “Heck, no, I was in the camps there.” This material was shown on TV anyway. They just cut out this piece ..."

A Studio in Maria Zankovetska Theater

"... So I came to the theater, and they looked at me puzzled, a big question mark on their faces. Why so? I came wearing a military uniform, tarpaulin boots, and a garrison cap. I guess they thought, “Why did she come dressed like that?” Well, I didn’t really have anything else. Romanytskyy, People’s Artist of the USSR, who was sitting at the table, said, “Don’t worry, sweetheart. We will dress you up.” And he called someone over (not sure who that was) and said, “Bring the costume designer here.” And that person did. And the costume designer dressed me up. She even supplied me with shoes. ..."

Creative Youth Club

"... And then a Creative Youth Club appeared in Lviv. The story behind it was as follows. Les Taniuk came to stage "Thus Huska Died". In the end, he was banned from staging the play, but he set up this Creative Youth Club headed by Mykhaylo Kosiv. I was a member of the presidium, and our task was to organize some sort of cultural soirees. Well, the first one was dedicated to Lenin, of course, like a ‘steam locomotive’. The second one was a serious piece – a soiree in honor of Lesya Ukrainka. And that was when I met Bohdan Stupka. ..."

The Most Difficult Phase of an Artist’s Work

"... And the last phase (at least the way I see it) is the most terrifying one. I’m not sure about other set designers, but I always stock up on sedatives during the last week when everything comes together on stage: all the props and costumes must ‘be brought to a common denominator’; grooves must fit into grooves; you don’t want actors to step on their costumes. Moreover, it all must look beautiful from an artistic point of view and create a nice artistic image. ..."

How to Work with Interviews

We really value the experience of those who agree to talk with us and want to make their voices heard. At the same time, we guarantee complete confidentiality to our interviewees. That’s why to get access to an interview, you are requested to read some excerpts from the Ukrainian legislation on personal data as well as ethical requirements and fill out a document equivalent to an informed consent form. We thank you in advance for your understanding and wish you pleasant reading and listening.