Chronicle

2018 Center's Fellows
January 29, 2019
In 2018-2019 the Center hosted 13 Grant Residents who conducted archival, library, and field studies in Lviv, and also presented open lectures and participate in Urban Seminars.

Scholars to study urban space with the help of due field research methods include Dr. Jens Adam (Berlin), with his research on perception and practices of "Europeization" in a city; Anna Barbieri (Vienna), with her plans to make a research film on Santa Barbara area in Sykhiv, and Elżbieta Olzacka (Krakow), who focuses on commemoration of Maydan in Ukrainian cities. One of the key aspects we support – multicultural history – is in the focus of the project by Dr. Bernard Wasserstein "Jews and Neighbors in Krakowiec, 1772-1946." Experience of socialism period will be tackled by Dr. Ulrike Huhn from Bremen ("In Search for the Needed Village. Ukrainian Ethnographers and "Invention of New Soviet Rituals" in Late Soviet Union"), Andrei Tcacenco from the University of California ("Culture of Complaint: Morality and Intimacy in the USSR after 1953"), Dr. Pierre Miège (Paris-Beijing, "Socialist Social Contract in USSR and in China"), and Jamie Freeman from the University of East England ("Constructing Identity: Kaliningrad and Place Appropriation"). Martin Rohde from Innsbruck explores the development of pubic education in Ukrainian community of Lviv in the time of late Habsburgs empire.

Special mission in the Center were carried out by four more scholars who did their research but also shared their findings in a format of articles for the "Lviv Interactive" platform. They are Dr. Aleksander Łupienko from Warsaw, Olha Kornienko from Kharkiv, Wiktor Wenglewicz from Krakow and Piotr Olechowski from Rzesów.

Also, welcome to apply for 2019-2020 Residence Grant at the Center. Applications are encouraged on a wide range of topics related to urban studies anywhere in the world. The grounds to stay in Lviv could be an interest in our library (covering such topics as urban history of the 19th-21st centuries, memory and heritage, public history and museum work, visual studies, etc.), in Urban Media Archive (collections of photos, videos, maps and oral stories), and in search for sources in the archives and libraries of Lviv. We consider projects that are not directly related to urban studies but tackle the fields of research we prioritize, such as multicultural history and heritage, visual studies, non-academic formats of history representation, etc.