Chronicle

City and the Confict
November 26, 2015

On November 26, 2015 the Center for Urban History hosted a lecture by Olena Betliy on "The City In The Kyiv City Council's Policies During The First World War" as part of the World War I exhibition.

The challenges facing the Kyiv City Council during the First World War, were not unique. Social policies were needed to help new vulnerable segments of the population (eg.: families in the lower social classes), build a network of institutions that would provide medical care to the wounded and general care for refugees, and establish a number of measures to combat the economic and fuel crises, among others. Despite this, the public council did not ignore the need to develop Kyiv. Interestingly, in this period, the Council attended not only to improving the infrastructure and expanding the city by creating new suburban communities, but also to the development of the city itself. The image of Kyiv, its functionality, the construction of urban space, and the development of an effective urban policy that was aimed at transforming Kyiv into an effective living organism - these were all issues that the Council was addressing. It is on these aspects which Olena Betliy focused her lecture on.

Olena Betliy - Ph.D., Associate Professor of History at the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy. Topics of research include: social history of Kyiv during the First World War and communist revolution; discursive practices employed in the European space, and the policies surrounding identity within the context of the European integration processes. She reads the courses on urban studies, mental maps of European space, and the history Central and Eastern Europe, 1989-2007.