Events by Day

Talk to Teachers
7 June 2018
On June 7, at 4 pm, we woold like to invite teachers to a talk with Rachel Stevens at the exhibition "A Key to the City". Venue – exhibition hall of the Center for Urban History (6, Bohomoltsia str.)

How should you teach about the complicated tragic history Lviv experienced in the Second World War? How do you detect, visualize and humanize the heritage of the exterminated and displaced communities that used to live in our city? How do you work with this heritage and local memory using the city’s space?
Welcome to join the discussion of the themes together with Rachel Stevens, a sculptor and a professor of arts from New Mexico University (USA).

Teachers are key actors to transmit experiences, skills, and knowledge to children who can help rethink the heritage and implement new approaches to its understanding and application. We would like to engage teachers to raise the topics of new approaches and attitudes towards global context of the Holocaust through the prism of memories and local experiences of Lviv, as well as to refer to contemporary contexts of the city. Themes of the talk include: working with contested historical issues engaging the spaces (fabric) of the city, eye-witnesses perspective on the events, issues of inclusion of ethnic communities into teaching about the history of the city.

For participation, please, fill in the registration form 

Simultaneous interpretation into Ukrainian will be available during the talk.

The exhibition by Rachel Stevens "A Key to the City" presents three projects revealing different aspects of Jewish heritage in Lviv, such as commemoration of the liquidation of the ghetto and the Janowska death camp 75 years ago; the incredible story of survival of 11 Jewish citizens in the sewers of the city, and a map of 100 Jewish sites of Lviv. The topics are represented through different formats with the use of different "languages" of narration about the Holocaust and memory in the city. The art installation, storytelling, and digital map offer new opportunities and perspectives of including Jewish heritage sites into the present-day space of Lviv.